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According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) construction workers are required to wear a helmet, but there are times when they do not have to wear one while on the jobsite.

The OSHA section on Safety and Health Regulations for Construction explains when a hard hat must be worn. Rule 1926.100a says, “Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head injury from impact, or from falling or flying objects, or from electrical shock and burns, shall be protected by protective helmets.”

Can Employers Adopt More Stringent Safety Requirements?

As mentioned before, there are cases where OSHA allows workers not to wear a hard hat. If there is no risk of sustaining a head injury in the construction area, OSHA does not require the use of a hard hat.

However, it is important to remember that OSHA only sets the minimum safety standards that an employer and employee must abide by. If an employer wants to go even further and require its workers to wear a hard hat at all times, then they can do that.

Nothing prevents the employer from adopting more stringent safety rules.

For example, OSHA says that a roofer may not have to wear a hard hat because the danger of a head injury occurring is small. However, if the roofer climbs down the ladder and works on the ground, then a hard hat might be required, because the danger of falling debris has increased.

To reiterate, even though OSHA may permit a worker to not wear a helmet, this does not prevent the employer from implementing stronger safety rules that may require its workers to wear a hard hat regardless of the risk of head injury.

Did You Know? According to the HistoryofHats.net, the first construction project that required workers to wear hard hats was building the Hoover Dam in 1931.

Doehrman Buba – Indianapolis injury lawyers

Source:https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id=24765

Mon, Sep 01, 2014
Source: Doehrman Chamberlain
underride-and-override-collisions

Photo of a semi driving on a highway.

The primary mission of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is to improve safety for large trucks and buses. This means FMCSA focuses on reducing the number of crashes, injuries and fatalities involving these large vehicles.

Many believe that FMCSA only has regulatory authority over trucks that travel across state lines, but this is not true. According to Safety.BLR.com, “the FMCSA regulations include all commercial motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 pounds, certain vehicles transporting passengers and vehicles transporting hazardous materials.”

In other words, a semi is subject to the FMCSA regulations even if it never crosses state lines. This is important, because some truck drivers believe the rules do not apply to them, which is resulting in them operating unsafely.

One example of truckers ignoring the FMCSA rules is the ban on texting or using handheld mobile phones.

Are Truck Drivers Allowed to Use Their Phones?

Truck drivers are not allowed to text or use handheld cell phones for making calls while driving. The reason for this rule is obvious: research shows that truckers who are texting are 23.2 times more likely to be involved in events that could lead to a crash.

On average, Safety.BLR.com says texting drivers took their eyes off the road for nearly five seconds. At 55 mph, that is equivalent to traveling the length of a football field without looking at the road.

Additionally, a semi requires more distance to come to a complete stop. At 55 mph, a truck requires nearly the full distance of a football field to come to a stop.

Truck drivers are negligent if they do not comply with the FMCSA regulations. The rules are in place for a reason and the motoring public is in danger if a driver chooses not to follow the rules.

Doehrman Buba –Indianapolis truck accident lawyers

Source: http://safety.blr.com/workplace-safety-news/transportation-safety/driver-safety-motor-carriers/Commercial-vehicle-safety-and-distracted-driving/

Sun, Aug 31, 2014
Source: Doehrman Chamberlain

Although our blog is frequently devoted to the areas surrounding personal injury law, we enjoy making note of special occasions that deserve to be discussed. In this case, Labor Day weekend is upon us. Every year on the first Monday of September, we Americans take time to honor our workforce who have built this great country.

The labor movement is responsible for creating this holiday. As the United States Department of Labor (DOL) says, Labor Day “constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.”

Our country is one of the most powerful economies in the world and our workers are to thank for that. Without this hard work, our country would not be nearly as prominent as it is today.

When Was the First Labor Day Holiday?

DOL says that the first Labor Day was held in New York City on September 5, 1882. On June 28, 1894, Congress made it a law that the first Monday of September was to be in observance of Labor Day.

Although there has been much social progress for our workers, they still fight to this day for their rights. However, through these struggles, they continue to push our country forward.

Our law firm is proud to say that we represent many workers who play a big part in making our country great. We work as hard for their rights as they do at their jobs.

Labor Day has been celebrated for more than 100 years. We look forward to celebrating it for many years to come.

Have a safe Labor Day weekend!

Indianapolis injury lawyers

Source: http://www.dol.gov/laborday/history.htm

Sat, Aug 30, 2014
Source: Doehrman Chamberlain

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According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) construction workers are required to wear a helmet, but there are times when they do not have to wear one while on the jobsite.

The OSHA section on Safety and Health Regulations for Construction explains when a hard hat must be worn. Rule 1926.100a says, “Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head injury from impact, or from falling or flying objects, or from electrical shock and burns, shall be protected by protective helmets.”

Can Employers Adopt More Stringent Safety Requirements?

As mentioned before, there are cases ...Read More

Mon, Sep 01, 2014
Source: Doehrman Chamberlain