Video Library

See More Videos »

Featured Blogs

In February, a Beech 1900 airplane crashed two miles outside of the Miami Executive Airport (also known as Tamiami Airport). The two crew members and two passengers did not survive the crash, and the questions that haunt this incident have led the victims' families to seek justice with our firm. The plane was owned by a security company based in Venezuela, and it was on a maintenance trip to Florida. It was scheduled to refuel in the Turks and Caicos before returning to South America, and before the trip, two men were offered seats to fly back with the crew. Minutes after takeoff, one of the plane's engines failed, and the crew requested to turn around and make an emergency landing. For reasons unknown, the plane approached the landing strip too low, collided with a utility pole and crashed. The two passengers, one a business owner and the other an...
Read More »

The post Plane Crash Victims' Wives Open Wrongful Death Suits appeared first on Colson Hicks Eidson.

Fri, Jul 31, 2015
Source: Colson Hicks Eidson

Lake County is a popular area for Central Florida bike riders. The many two lane, lightly travelled roads that wind their way through the hills are idyllic, but new subdivisions are sprouting up, and traffic on these roads are increasing. Now a controversy is starting to boil over as the new motorists begin to clash with the cyclists. Facebook posts on the Clermont/Minneola Community Awareness page have punctuated a rising unease between the local bicyclists and drivers. Posts offering “double points” for hitting a pack of cyclists, or threatening to throw tacks on the road, have shaken some despite claims that the posts were only a joke. “The aggression and frustration has grown,” says one local bike rider. “It gets pretty tense sometimes. There's definitely an issue at hand,” says another. Is There Any Way To Stop Aggressive Drivers? Rumors have begun to circulate that bikers are being run off...
Read More »

The post Aggressive Drivers An Increasing Danger To Florida Bicyclists appeared first on Colson Hicks Eidson.

Fri, Jul 31, 2015
Source: Colson Hicks Eidson
Photo of a truck driver

The smallest mistake can cause a devastating truck accident. While weather, road conditions, vehicle performance and defective truck parks can be the reasons for an accident, the vast majority of truck accident cases involve driver error. According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, driver error is 10 times more likely to cause an accident than any other factor.

The FMCSA, in an attempt to quantify these driver errors, found that of all truck accidents caused by a truck driver:

44 percent of the truck drivers were under the influence of prescription or over-the-counter drugs. Even though these drugs are legal, they can still cause side effects such as drowsiness that can cause a truck accident 23 percent of drivers were driving too fast for road conditions, which can lead to vehicle rollovers, jackknife accidents, spilled cargo injuries and hazardous waste leaks 18 percent were caused by driver fatigue, an endemic condition that often results from the economic model for trucking that encourages drivers to squeeze in as many hours as possible and take shortcuts in order to maximize time on the road

A less common driver error is merging into blind spots; according to research, semi truck accidents are 60 percent more likely when a car drives in the semi truck's blind spot. If you have suffered injuries as a result of driver error in a truck accident, you need to speak with an attorney to discuss your plans for recovery moving forward.

Doehrman Buba – Indianapolis Truck Accident Attorneys

The post What Are the Most Common Truck Accident Driver Errors? appeared first on Doehrman Buba - Indianapolis Injury Attorneys With Decades of Success.

Fri, Jul 31, 2015
Source: Doehrman Chamberlain

Video Library

See More Videos »

Law Blog

See More Law Blog posts »

Featured Blog Post

In February, a Beech 1900 airplane crashed two miles outside of the Miami Executive Airport (also known as Tamiami Airport). The two crew members and two passengers did not survive the crash, and the questions that haunt this incident have led the victims' families to seek justice with our firm. The plane was owned by a security company based in Venezuela, and it was on a maintenance trip to Florida. It was scheduled to refuel in the Turks and Caicos before returning to South America, and before the trip, two men were offered seats to fly back with the crew. ...Read More

Fri, Jul 31, 2015
Source: Colson Hicks Eidson