Recalled Baby Carriers to Avoid

, , ,

In February, baby and childcare products company Infantino voluntarily recalled over 14,000 different toddler and infant carriers after receiving encouragement to do so by the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which regulates the ongoing safety of many different consumer goods. The carriers’ alleged problem was their buckles, which Infantino said could potentially break and pose a risk of falling to the child being carried in the harness.

The harnesses, as reported by the parenting website Fatherly, were sold throughout November and December at large retailers nationwide, including Target and Amazon. Luckily, the potential problem was discovered by Infantino before any children were proved to be harmed by the harnesses.

Check to see if your baby carrier has been recalled.

Because Infantino discovered a potential problem with the harnesses and consulted the CPSC, they were able to prevent injuries that could have occurred in the future. Because there were no documented cases of injuries stemming from the harnesses, it is difficult to know whether or not children would have been harmed had their parents continued using them.

Whatever the safety status of the harnesses, Infantino made the correct call by pulling them off of the market when their safety was in doubt. Many other companies have also recalled past products that are suspected to cause illness or injury. This can help keep consumers safe while the affected company pinpoints and takes care of the problem.

Many companies will not issue a recall until consumers point out the dangers.

However, while companies and consumer agencies work to ensure that products are safe, there are always new or untested products that consumers should use good judgment about. If you are thinking of trying a new product that you haven’t heard much news about, search for that news and other customer reviews before trying the product.

This is especially important when it comes to products made for infants or small children. Young children are more vulnerable to illness and injury than older children or adults, so caution should be used when deciding to buy products made especially for them.

What to do if you or your child is hurt by a product.

Of course, as stated previously, there are always products that fly under the radar. No consumer has the time or means to research and test every product they buy independently, and sometimes the tests of the companies or consumer agencies fail. If you are hurt by a product, it is always wise to contact an attorney. They will be able to help you figure out the exact defect of the product and how it has impacted you, and they can work with companies and agencies to have the product recalled or fixed. They will also be able to assess your case and the product’s defect, and guide you on how to pursue potential legal avenues, receive fair compensation from your illness or injury, and begin to recover from the harm you suffered.