Why Being a Good Lawyer Isn’t Enough

Written by AskTheLawyers.com™

Why Being a Good Lawyer Isn’t Enough
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A core tenant in traditional American philosophy is that hard work pays off; as great as it would be if this rule were true across the board, being a hard worker who is good at what they do is simply not enough. Particularly in industries where competition is high, being good at what you do isn’t enough to ensure success.

The legal industry in particular is a field where it can be easy to fall into the idea that years of grueling education and consistently good work performance should result in a steady stream of clients and desirable income. However, being a good lawyer is not enough on its own to guarantee these benefits. Attorneys and law firms need to engage in the same or similar marketing practices as other fields to remain competitive and thereby successful.

Just because you’re a good lawyer doesn’t mean anyone will hear about it.

While competence in your profession is certainly important, the visibility of that competence is arguably more so. You could be the greatest lawyer of all time, but if your target market is not aware of you and your stunning record, your practice will likely garner fewer clients than an average or even sub-par law firm with great marketing does. Being good at what you do is the first step, but the second step of paramount importance is communicating that skill to your desired audience. This is where marketing comes in.

Attorney marketing is vital to a healthy career in law.

The idea that only certain industries need to invest time, effort, and money into marketing is both outdated and simply untrue. Where there is competition, there is a need for marketing. Particularly in a world where potential clients have access to any service their hearts desire at the tip of their fingers, you want to be one of the first sources that arise when they type a need into a web search or scroll through social media looking for valuable information.

If someone is looking for a lawyer and their case falls perfectly into your niche, but they come across another attorney’s web presence first, that is a case you’re probably going to miss out on. This is why digital marketing is especially important for law firms; business that has typically been conducted in brick-and-mortar settings is happening remotely, and the legal industry is not exempt from this growing trend.

You’re not the only good lawyer out there.

Humility is an important piece in the attorney marketing puzzle; it’s essential to remember that you are not the only one who is good at what you do. Even if you are in the top 10%, your competition is likely engaging in marketing efforts of their own. Additionally, you are still in competition with the other 90%, especially if they are engaged in more aggressive marketing efforts. It’s not enough to be a good lawyer, or even the best lawyer.

To be successful in almost any industry at this point in history, you need to be the best at your job and the best at marketing. One without the other cannot create a healthy and sustainable career. The good news is that marketing does not have to be an all-encompassing, time-draining, money-consuming thing. Efforts as simple as starting a blog and keeping it current, consistently engaging on a few chosen social media platforms, and providing the type of content your market is looking for, such as attorney videos and FAQs, can all go a long way to increasing your visibility as an excellent lawyer looking to take on clients.

To learn more about the importance of attorney marketing or for help starting your own marketing plan, reach out to a legal marketing expert.

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