Attorney Explains How to Report Medicare Fraud and Medicaid Fraud

Attorney Jason Brown | 888-981-0016 | Free Consult

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"The False Claims Act is a federal act that incentivizes whistleblowers to come forward with information about entities that are systemically defrauding the federal government out of money. Typically, this involves Medicare fraud, Medicaid fraud, and defense contractor fraud."

Have you witnessed Medicare fraud, Medicaid fraud, or defense contractor fraud? Under the False Claims Act, you could recover compensation if you report the fraud.  However, as attorney Jason Brown explains in this video, there is a certain procedure you should follow when blowing the whistle on fraudulent behavior.

Brown is a former FBI special agent and legal adviser. He can use this experience to guide you in the right direction so you don’t make any mistakes. He says that anyone considering blowing the whistle on Medicare, Medicaid, or defense contractor fraud should call an attorney with qui tam whistleblower litigation experience.

Jason Brown is Senior Litigator and head of the law firm Brown, LLC, based in Jersey City, New Jersey. He helps people throughout the country.

To learn more, contact the attorney directly by calling 888-981-0016 or by submitting a contact form on this page. There is no charge for the consultation, and you never owe any out-of-pocket attorney fees.

Key Takeaways From Jason Brown:

The federal False Claims Act is a federal act that incentivizes whistleblowers to come forward with information about entities that are systemically defrauding the federal government out of money. It encourages whistleblowers to come forward by promising compensation if investigators find evidence of fraud.

You are entitled to compensation if the government finds evidence of fraud.

Once the government intervenes and determines that fraud is occurring, Brown says, you can receive between 15 and 25 percent of what the government recovers through its investigation and any subsequent lawsuits. If the government does not intervene in the case and decides to investigate, you could receive up to 30 percent of the case’s recovered losses. These amounts can vary depending on the case, and if the government determines that there is no fraud, you are not entitled to any kind of compensation.

The government may or may not intervene depending on the case.

Cases, says Brown, are presented to the government under seal, which means that the government can review them and decide if they want to pursue legal action. If the government decides to intervene, then that means they are choosing to pursue legal action against the entity accused of the fraud. They will then file a formal investigation notice and begin looking into the case and the actions of the entities.

If the government decides not to intervene, that means that they will not be pursuing legal action against the accused entity. There are several outcomes through this possibility. One is that private counsel—like Brown—can move in and investigate the case if they think there are any assets that could be recovered. The government may also decide that there is no valid case and that they are effectively closing the claim and not pursuing any kind of action. According to Brown, there has been controversy over whether or not the government can choose to shut down a case in which there is proof that it has been defrauded.

Speak with an attorney before you blow the whistle.

Some entities, if they learn that you have reported their fraud, may attempt to retaliate against you professionally or legally. Especially if you are closely connected to the accused entity—as an employee, for example—it is always good practice to have an attorney on hand to help guide you through potential complications and legal roadblocks. They can ensure that you present the case quickly and efficiently to the government under the rules of the False Claims Act, and they can help with instances of retaliation and in helping you get the compensation that you are entitled to.

To learn more, contact Jason Brown directly by calling 888-981-0016 or by submitting a contact form on this page. There is no charge for the consultation, and you never owe any out-of-pocket attorney fees.

Disclaimer: This video is for informational purposes only. In some states, this video may be deemed Attorney Advertising. The choice of lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely on advertisements.

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